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November 27th 1897
The News — Frederick, Maryland

THE POLITICAL FIELD
WARFIELD MONROE SLATED FOR SURVEYOR OF THE PORT

Latest Gossip as the Legislative Offices — Ashley Goald, of Montgomery County, Spoken of for Speaker of the House.

A special dispatch to the Baltimore News from Washington says:

“The vacancy in the office of Surveyor of the Port of Baltimore, occasioned by the removal of Colonel Buchanan Schley, of Hagerstown, last spring, will be filled within the next few days. It may be stated upon information obtained from a reliable source that President McKinley will name Mr. A. Warfield Monroe as Colonel Schley’s successor, and that Mr. Monroe will be officially notified of his appointment through the Treasury Department not later than Monday next, and possibly tomorrow.”

Mr. Monroe is well known in Baltimore and throughout the State. He has for years filled the position of confidential business manager for Postmaster General James A. Gary, and at present exercises a general supervision over all of the latter’s large business enterprises. He has been a lifelong Republican and actively identified with the work of the part in Maryland ever since he obtained his majority. He has never held office himself. Mr. Moore is a warm personal friend of President McKinley, has known him for many years and ardently supported his nomination and election to the Presidency.

Mr. Monroe will be relieved of any annoyance on the subject of the patronage of his office, as his subordinates are all in the classified service. As he is to be appointed to fill a vacancy he will enter upon the discharge of his duties immediately after the President signs his commission.

Mr. Monroe’s appointment, when it is finally made, will be the result of his personal acquaintance with the President. It seems that immediately after the removal Colonel Schley in April the President intimated to Postmaster General Gary and Senator Wellington that he would like to give that place to Mr. Monroe. He was asked to delay the matter, and he did. Later, he called Mr. Gary and the Senator before him and asked them to indorse Mr. Monroe. The Senator said he would do so provided Mr. Gary also did it. Mr Gary said that he did not wish to be placed in the position of asking for the appointment of one of his employees, and that while he would like to see Mr. Monroe have the place, he preferred to have it come to him in some other way than through his personal indorsement. Senator Wellington then refused to give his indorsement, and there the matter rested until last week, when Mr. Gary and he agreed to unite in the indorsement of Mr. Monroe in accordance with the President’s request.

The salary of Surveyor is $4500. The department under him is that which has charge of the customs inspectors and gaugers, and is in some respects the most important connected with the service. Col. Washington Bowie of Montgomery county, the deputy, has been acting Surveyor since the removal of Colonel Schley.

In this connection it can be stated that the appointment of Mr. Monroe will cause great disappointment to Congressman Baker of the Second district, who has asked for the place for J. B. Hanna of Belair. Congressman McIntire, McDonald and Barber have joined with Mr. Baker in favor of Mr. Hanna, and in all the speculation regarding the office no mention has heretofore been made of Mr. Monroe, whose appointment may be looked upon as a personal one made by the President on his own motion.